Delhi: Water level in Yamuna rises; over 100 families moved to safer areas
Breaking News

Delhi: Water level in Yamuna rises; over 100 families moved to safer areas

The water level in the Yamuna in Delhi increased again and was recorded at 205.30 meters on Sunday morning, just below the danger mark of 205.33 meters, as rains continued to lash Delhi

Topics

Yamuna | Delhi | monsoons

The water level in the Yamuna in Delhi increased again and was recorded at 205.30 meters on Sunday morning, just below the danger mark of 205.33 meters, as rains continued to lash Delhi and upper catchment areas of the river, officials said.

According to the officials, over 100 families living in the Yamuna floodplains have been moved to higher areas over the last few days.

On Friday, the Delhi administration had sounded a flood alert and expedited efforts to evacuate people from vulnerable areas, as the river in the capital breached the danger mark of 205.33 metres amid heavy rains in the upper catchment areas.

The water level was recorded at 205.30 metres at the Old Railway Bridge at 9 am.

On Friday, the Yamuna had breached the danger mark and swelled to 205.59 metres by 9 pm. It had receded to 204.89 metres on Saturday evening, according to the Delhi flood control room.

With Haryana discharging more water into the river from the Hathnikund Barrage, the Delhi Police and the East Delhi district administration have been evacuating people living on the floodplains of the Yamuna in the capital.

“The flood alert remains in place. We have deployed boats in different areas and families living in vulnerable areas are being temporarily moved into tents and shelter homes of the city government,” an official of the Delhi Disaster Management Authority said.

A flood alert is declared when the Yamuna crosses the “warning mark” of 204.50 metres.

The Delhi flood control room reported a discharge rate of 17,827 cusecs from the Hathnikund Barrage in Haryana’s Yamunanagar district at 9 am.

Normally, the flow rate at the Hathnikund barrage is 352 cusec, but the discharge is increased after heavy rainfall in catchment areas.

It had peaked to 1.60 lakh cusecs on Tuesday, the highest this year so far.

The water discharged from the barrage normally takes two-three days to reach the capital.

One cusec is equivalent to 28.32 litres per second.

A Met Department official said “moderate to heavy” rains are predicted in northwest India over the next few days, which is likely to increase water levels in the rivers flowing through the region.

In 2019, the flow rate had peaked to 8.28 lakh cusec on August 18-19, and the water level of the Yamuna had hit the 206.60 metre-mark, breaching the danger mark of 205.33 metres.

In 1978, the river had swelled to the all-time record water level of 207.49 metres.

In 2013, it had risen to 207.32 metres.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.


We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

Leave a Reply